Sleep, Organization, and Your Child’s Mind

Sleep, Organization, and Your Child's Mind | SimpleKids.net

I was thinking of how to optimize my kiddos’ ability to learn, but I wanted to improve the processes already in place rather than making them learn something to improve the way they learn something. Yeah, the common sense just isn’t there for me.

The two factors that I felt I could work on were ensuring their restfulness and cleanliness.

I will start with the cleanliness.

I know there’s a difference in the way my kids function when the house is messy versus when it’s spotless. I further knew that there had to, somewhere, be scientific evidence to prove it. Well, I found it, and it affects the mind more than I thought.

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The Squeaky Wheel

So it’s been said, “The squeaky wheel gets the grease.” As an idiom, it means that the one who complains the loudest… well, they get the attention and the fix before the other applicants.

I would much rather not need grease.  I would rather be quietly content.

As parents, we need to be fully aware of the fact that our kids will turn into some derivative of us one day.   I am very similar to my parents in many many ways, but I’m blessed with nothing less than hard-working, joyous, exceptional souls as parents.

I’m not saying I’m all those things, but I am fully confident that the path they’ve shown me – tread by love alone – will direct me toward my goal of being so.

Alright. So what about that squeaky parent in all of us?  The obnoxious plaintiff…  The parent that causes a mid-game cancellation of a five-year-old’s soccer match…  That niche inside of us all that begs to talk at people rather than allow for a rewarding two-way conversation…  Consider what the next generation of that will entail.

I’m not aiming to have this come out as a negative rant.  Instead, I think I’ve figured out the difference between the squeaking and the non-sqeaking:

Squeakers need what they want. Non-squeakers want what they need.

How do you approach a positive attitude shift when you catch yourself squeaking?

1. Make sure your brain-to-mouth filter is fully engaged.

2. Regulate your volume.

3. Zoom out and determine where your demeanor would fall on the ‘brightness’ scale if you were a fly on the wall… or a colleague, teacher, or bank teller.

These may sound cheesy, but it’s in an attempt to make us not sound like [donkeys] for all our kids to hear… and eventually emulate it whether they realize or not.

Ever catch yourself doing the “mom gasp?”  Ever push the brakes of a car… on the passenger floorboard when you’re not driving?  Obviously I have.  But, I can attest to the wonderful truth of my mom not being a squeaker.

So basically, if we’re not pleased with something, let’s try not to pollute the population around us with negative noise.  Pursue your happiness instead pleasantly and peacefully… but only if you want your kids and my kids and those-people-over-there’s kids to do the same.

When do you find it the hardest to keep your cool? What do you do about it?

‘Second nature’ activities

Second Nature: simple ideas for making time outdoors a regular habit | SimpleKids.net

I think the whole purpose of this get-your-kids-outside initiative is to make it effortless. We want our kids to have the joys we did when being in the fresh air was the norm rather than the exception. That said, I think anything you do outside is a step in the right direction. Activities like sidewalk chalk and finger painting are always a hit, and these aren’t things you have to convince your kids to do.

After your kids get tired of all the physical activity in your yard or at the park and they are ready to leave, don’t leave. Let them wind down outside.

Take advantage of what’s around:

• Grab some twigs and, if your kids are at the appropriate age, form them into letters and shapes. Take advantage of them actually being too tired to run and make learning fun. If your kids are a little older, tell them to make something. I’m pretty sure this is where the idea for Legos and Tinkertoys originated; skip the middle man.

• Lie under a tree and look up – find shapes in the sunlight that’s peeking through the network of branches. Or cloud watch and find shapes that way.

• Look for 4-leaf clovers.

• Have a board game close at hand to bring out for these occasions.

• Make flower bracelets or tear a branch into strips and make a crown.

• Look under big rocks and count how many different bugs are under there.

• Be still and just listen. Talk about how many different sounds you hear. Test your kid’s sense of direction and see if they can distinguish which way the sound is coming/going.

• Have paper airplane competitions. To be nice to nature, bring some used computer paper that you’d throw away/recycle otherwise then pick it up when you’re done.

• Kick or throw a ball. The extent of this activity will depend on the age of your kids but the worst that can happen is them gaining more coordination regardless of their level.

• Find a tree. Climb it. Then tell your kids to while you spot them.

• Roll down a hill – a hill that doesn’t have any boulders or cacti.

• Play “I spy…”

These are just suggestions and if you think they’re not going to entertain your kids, I hope they’ll at least act as a springboard for your brainstorming of better ones. However, I’m definitely not the only one with ideas. Remember that Louv guy? He’s got his own huge list of pretty great ideas.

I haven’t gotten into this with my kids, but we’ve learned a lot about geocaching from family members and they’re crazy about the activity. All you need is a GPS. From what I’ve seen, this activity has quality time built-in.

I just want my kids to know that “that tree over there can serve as its own corner of creativity and fun. I don’t want them to grow up and assume that all knowledge is gained by STARING AT PAPER or coloring inside the lines.

These pre-sets that our kids get now from our culture—they’re all things that man created. Some of these are very great contributions to the world – yes, but I bet the men who created those wonderful things had a better relationship with nature than the majority of kids now do.

When we feel like something is a routine we follow without effort, we say, “It’s second nature to me.” Kids today are growing up with a lot of things that rank second in importance… I bet you anything it’s not nature for most.

Where do you and your family spend most of your time outdoors?